Learning analytics: Current movements and future directions

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For our last presentation in 2015 the Transforming Teaching and Learning with Practical Analytics team are very happy to have Dr LynchGrace_2014 return to provide a summary of the seminars presented in 2015. She will also offer suggestions for future directions in learning analytics. Dr Lynch is Managing Director of Lynch & Associates and is an international scholar and highly regarded consultant. Dr Lynch is the Executive Manager of the Society for Learning Analytics Research (SOLAR), an inaugural member of the NSW Learning Analytics Group, Adjunct Professor University of New England and assists a number of Australian universities with the development of learning analytics strategies and implementations.

When: Tuesday 24th November 2015
Where: Building 80, level 10, room 17, RMIT University, Swanston Street, Melbourne

Academics, professional staff and students are all invited to attend.
The presentation is free. To register go to here.

To find out more information please contact: peter.saunders@rmit.edu.au

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Image by dalioPhoto

Understanding one’s own learning process. A presentation by Dr Christopher Cheong

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We are happy to have Dr Christopher Cheong present for us as part of our LTIF project Transforming Teaching and Learning with Practical Analytics. Dr Cheong is a senior lecturer in the School of Business IT and Logistics. His teaching ischris focused on the design and development of information systems for business. He has won numerous awards for his teaching. His research interest involves the application of computational techniques to address issues in various domains, such as business and education. Dr Cheong’s more recent research investigates how to improve student outcomes through the use of technology-enhanced learning, including analytics and persuasive systems.

In his presentation Dr Cheong will discuss how he created his own software, called Task-Test-Monitor (TTM), to increase student engagement and to help students better understand their own learning processes. Dr Cheong will demonstrate how TTM works and will present some preliminary results evaluating the software.

When: Wednesday 18th November, 12:30- 1:30 pm
Where: Building 80, level 3, room 15

Academics, professional staff and students are all invited to attend.

The presentation is free. To register go to here.

Google Analytics for Learning Analytics. A presentation by Martin Hawksey and Nico Miceli

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We were very excited to have Martin Hawksey and Nico Miceli present about learning analytics. They provided some fascinating insights about Google analytics. If you missed their presentation you can watch it below.

Google+ and Communities. A presentation by Grant Cooper.

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The Transforming Teaching and Learning with Practical Analytics team Google+_are happy to announce that Grant Cooper will be presenting at RMIT University. This will be the eleventh presentation in our seminar series. Grant Cooper is an associate lecturer at RMIT University and has particular interests in Science Education, how technology can transform pedagogical approaches across teaching sectors and multivariate quantitative analysis in the Social Sciences.

In this presentation Grant Cooper will discuss the pros and cons of using Google+ and Google Communities. He will explain and demonstrate how Google+ and Communities can be used to improve the courses you teach.

When: Tuesday 10th November, 12:30-1:30 pm
Where: Building 80, level 2, room 3

The event is free. Students and staff are invited to attend.

To register please click here.

Google Analytics for Learning Analytics. A presentation by Martin Hawksey and Nico Miceli

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Martin

Martin Hawksey

We are very pleased to have Martin Hawksey and Nico Miceli present for us via Google Hangouts on air as part of our LTIF project. Martin is the Chief Innovation, Technology and Community Officer for the Association for Learning Technology in the UK. He has held various advisory roles within the UK educational technology sector for a number of government-funded services. In these roles, he has supported staff in the exploration and adoption of innovative approaches to teaching and learning and has enhanced ways in which members connect. This has included developing and using analytics to provide staff and members with data informed insights.

Nico

Nico Miceli

Nico is a Technical Analytics Consultant for Team Demystified in the US. He works on Global Adobe Analytics Implementation for the Amway Corporation and manages the analytics on the SMB Marketing Team of Google. He is also a Google developer expert and writes custom JavaScript to track behaviour.

Traffic analysis tools for websites are well established with Google Analytics reportedly having the majority market share used in over 80% of websites with tracking enabled. As the internet and web technologies have evolved so has the functionality of traffic analysis tools going far beyond pageviews enabling cohort analysis, acquisitions and conversion reporting, and more. A more recent development is the emergence of Learning Analytics which focus on “the measurement, collection, analysis and reporting of data about learners and their contexts, for purposes of understanding and optimising learning and the environments in which it occurs“. Given the proportion of learning and teaching that now occurs online this session explores how Google Analytics can be used for Learning Analytics. As part of this we cover Google Analytics tracking and integration techniques including how Google Analytics can provide custom reporting and enable actionable insight.

When: Wednesday 4th November, 9:30-10:30 am (Australian Eastern Time)
Where: Building 80, level 2, room 3 (and via Google hangouts on air)

You will also be able to watch the presentation via Google Hangouts on air. You will be provided with details after you have registered.

Academics, professional staff and students are all invited to attend.
The presentation is free. To register go to here.

Creating Connections in Complexity: exploring the bright and dark of big data in our practice. A presentation by Dr. Theresa Dirndorfer Anderson

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We are very pleased to have Dr. Theresa Dirndorfer Anderson present as part of our “Transforming Learning and Teaching with Practical Analytics” project. Dr Theresa Dirndorfer Anderson is Course Coordinator of the Master of Data Science and ITheresa Andersonnnovation in the Connected Intelligence Centre of the University of Technology Sydney.  In her teaching and her research, Theresa engages with the ever- evolving relationship between people and emerging technologies, conceptually engaging with notions of risk, uncertainty and creativity. As an information ethicist, she is particularly interested in the interaction between creative and analytic thinking and doing and in examining ways information systems and institutional policies might better support both creative and analytic activities. At UTS, Theresa designs and delivers courses in the new Master of Data Science & Innovation, and specialist subjects about online learning communities and the design of eLearning curriculum.

Distributed, cloud-based networks and the boundary-blurring capacities of digital convergence marked the beginning of a transition to genuine distributed, complex, evolving infrastructure (Edwards et al., 2009: 365-6). In these dynamic, hyper-coordinated spaces, people create, curate and use information in evolving and often unexpected ways. These data-intensive environments compel us to address the challenges and complexities raised in studies of cyberinfrastructure (Bowker et al, 2010), including ethical considerations about the capacity for individuals to resist machine-generated classifications and characterizations or offer alternative interpretations (boyd & Crawford, 2012; Ratto, 2007).

Structures associated with the ubiquitous technologies that often grab the spotlight rarely lend themselves to deliberate design and yet, ironically, as they become more naturalized and more invisible, their configuration can become more frozen. Thus, as boyd & Crawford (2012: 666) alert us: “We must ask difficult questions of Big Data’s models of intelligibility before they crystallize into new orthodoxies.”

One particularly strong theme emerging relates to the capacity for humans and machines in these infrastructures to learn and to respond to inevitable changes they will encounter. In addition to moral concerns flagged in Edwards et al. (2009) and Ratto (2007), for instance, questions of speed arise in relation to the time available for personal and communal knowledge production and acquisition in increasingly hyper-coordinated information spaces (Anderson, 2011, Hunsinger, 2013).  To survive and thrive in these fast-paced, data-rich networks, we must learn how to learn (Deakin Crick, 2007).

This session will engage participants interested in human-centered design in relation to big data and learning analytics. In response to the concerns raised by Edwards et al. (2009) to articulate concerns that can traverse the social and computational sciences, the session design is intended to identify ways to move forward as a community and as professionals.

When: Tuesday 20th October, 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Where: Building 80, level 4, room 19

Academics, professional staff and students are all invited to attend.
The presentation is free. To register go to here.

To find out more information please contact: peter.saunders@rmit.edu.au 

If you would like to prepare for the session, participants are encouraged to click here.

References

Anderson, T.D. (2011). Beyond eureka moments: supporting the invisible work of creativity and innovation. Information Research, 16(1) paper 471. Available: http://InformationR.net/ir/16-1/paper471.html

boyd, d., & Crawford, K. (2012). Critical questions for big data: Provocations for a cultural, technological, and scholarly phenomenon. Information, Communication & Society, 15(5), 662-679.

Bowker, G. C., Baker, K., Millerand, F., & Ribes, D. (2010). Toward information infrastructure studies: Ways of knowing in a networked environment. In J. Hunsinger, L. Klastrup, & M. Allen (Eds.), International handbook of internet research (pp. 97-117). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Brown, J., & Isaacs, D. (2005). The world café: Shaping our futures through conversations that matter. San Francisco, CA: Berrett-Koehler Publishers.

Deakin Crick, R. (2007). Learning how to learn: The dynamic assessment of learning power. The Curriculum Journal, 18(2), 135-153.

Edwards, P. N., Bowker, G. C., Jackson, S. J., & Williams, R. (2009). Introduction: an agenda for infrastructure studies. Journal of the Association for Information Systems, 10(5), 364-374.

Gray, D., Brown, S., & Macanufo, J. (2010). Gamestorming: A playbook for innovators, rulebreakers, and changemakers. Sabastopol, CA: O’Reilly Media, Inc.

Hunsinger, Jeremy (2013). Against speed cosmopolitanism towards the slow university. Fast Capitalism, 10.1, http://www.uta.edu/huma/agger/fastcapitalism/10_1/home.html.

Hunsinger, J. (2009). Introducing learning infrastructures: invisibility, context, and governance. Learning Inquiry, 3(3), 111-114.

Long, P & Siemens, G. 2011 “Penetrating the fog: Analytics in learning and education.” Educause Review 46.5 (2011): 30-32.

Ratto, M. (2007). Ethics of seamless infrastructures: Resources and future directions. International Review of Information Ethics, 8 (12), 20-27.

Guide to Online Tools Workshop. Presented by Samantha Vardanega

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We were very excited to have Samantha Vardanega present as part of our Transforming Learning and Teaching with Practical Analytics project. In her presentation Samantha discussed when it is appropriate to use certain online tools and introduced us to a range of different tools and applications that can be used in learning and teaching. You can find the link to her slides here and you can watch the video of Samantha’s presentation below.

Google and Learning Analytics. Presented by Blake Seufert

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The “Transforming Learning and Teaching with Practical Analytics” project hosted a presentation by Blake Seufert at RMIT University on 20 August, 2015. Blake is a Google trainer and Systems Manager at McKinnon Secondary College in Melbourne. We were delighted to have Blake present on how to use Google analytics in an educational environment. He demonstrated how to access data from Google analytics to monitor student progress. You can watch Blake’s presentation below.

Student Engagement- The Next Step. Presented by Pauline Farrell

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Pauline Farrell is the Director of Education Leadership and Student Engagement at Swinburne University. Pauline presented at RMIT University on the 5th of August as part of our LTIF project. In her presentation Pauline showed how learning analytics can be used to understand the student perspective and influence change across organisation. You can watch her presentation below.

Pauline